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Re: Another beautiful Jameson's

Brilliant snake and photos!
by WW
Fri Nov 01, 2013 3:45 pm
 
Forum: Exotic highly venomous snakes
Topic: Another beautiful Jameson's
Replies: 10
Views: 2448

Re: Images of D. jamesoni Northern Angola

The main difference is that in D. viridis the dorsal scales on the upper sides and middle of the back are twice as long as those of the outermost (lowest) rows of dorsal scales. Your photos show that very nicely. In D. jamesoni, the middle dorsal scales are large but normal.
by WW
Sun Oct 13, 2013 7:52 pm
 
Forum: Exotic highly venomous snakes
Topic: Images of D. jamesoni Northern Angola
Replies: 23
Views: 4486

Re: What a load of BS!

It's a very odd case. Whatever happened, it was a series of extraordinary unlikely coincidences. It does not make much sense herpetologically, but not from any other angle either.
by WW
Thu Aug 15, 2013 3:19 pm
 
Forum: News and Announcements
Topic: What a load of BS!
Replies: 25
Views: 3014

Re: What a load of BS!

That Fox story is 100% speculation without any real information, and it's also well out of date (check the date - before the autopsy; and consider the source: Fox!). The RCMP have explicitly denied that it is specifically a murder investigation: http://m.news889.com/2013/08/14/reports-of-snake-murde...
by WW
Thu Aug 15, 2013 9:23 am
 
Forum: News and Announcements
Topic: What a load of BS!
Replies: 25
Views: 3014

Re: Kenya Naja

Yeah, that's a Naja nigricollis - they are very variable in Kenya, from pure black to the sort of thing seen in the photo.
by WW
Sun Aug 04, 2013 9:47 pm
 
Forum: Cobras (Naja sp.)
Topic: Kenya Naja
Replies: 4
Views: 1332

Re: C.simus or C.durissus??

Yup, C. simus. Confusingly, it was precisely these C. American rattlesnakes that used to be called C. durissus durissus, whereas the S. American populations now called C. durissus durissus were then called C. durissus dryinas. The reason is to do with the origin of the type specimen of Linnaeus' C. ...
by WW
Fri Aug 02, 2013 3:19 pm
 
Forum: Rattlesnakes (Crotalus sp.)
Topic: C.simus or C.durissus??
Replies: 7
Views: 1634

Re: Tete , Northern Mozambique

Great early obs, look forward to following this!

I reckon the skin is a Dasypeltis - the scales are clearly keeled (bearing in mind it's inside-out, so it is "negatively keeled" (= grooved), and I am pretty sure I can see some slightly oblique scales on the lower sides (top left of photo)
by WW
Sun May 19, 2013 4:18 pm
 
Forum: Exotic reptile observation records
Topic: Tete , Northern Mozambique
Replies: 60
Views: 11241

Re: Euro vipers/ Middle East Vipers

brian petrie wrote:Just to add, on Wolfgangs list of Montivipera there is also latifii.
Cheers,
Brian.


Ooops, my bad, overlooked that one - thanks Brian!
by WW
Sat May 11, 2013 12:54 pm
 
Forum: Exotic highly venomous snakes
Topic: Euro vipers/ Middle East Vipers
Replies: 17
Views: 4972

Re: Euro vipers/ Middle East Vipers

Most snakes have a single large scale above the eye, called the supraocular. However, a few snakes this is broken up into a series of several smaller scales bordering the upper margin of the eye (e.g., puff adder) - that's what I meant. Example in Macrovipera schweizeri: http://www.arkive.org/cyclad...
by WW
Fri May 10, 2013 3:47 pm
 
Forum: Exotic highly venomous snakes
Topic: Euro vipers/ Middle East Vipers
Replies: 17
Views: 4972

Re: Euro vipers/ Middle East Vipers

Thanks Wolfgang. I thought DNA sequencing would solve all our problems but they have just made it worse. Mitochondrial sequencing has provided a number of answers - just not those everybody was hoping for ;) Of course the next generation of nuclear gene studies won't be far behind and no doubt prod...
by WW
Thu May 09, 2013 11:39 am
 
Forum: Exotic highly venomous snakes
Topic: Euro vipers/ Middle East Vipers
Replies: 17
Views: 4972

Re: Euro vipers/ Middle East Vipers

There has been a fair bit of change in the genus-level classification of European vipers. The best of the current evidence points towards the following arrangement: Daboia: russelii, siamensis, palaestinae, mauritanica, deserti. Large vipers with intact supraocular shields. Many authors and checklis...
by WW
Thu May 09, 2013 7:21 am
 
Forum: Exotic highly venomous snakes
Topic: Euro vipers/ Middle East Vipers
Replies: 17
Views: 4972

Re: feather leg baboon tarantula, the bite stings a bit

BV: Yes, at least some spiders can regulate their venom expenditure just like snakes, or even better! See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8599185 , http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10393823 and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12175611
by WW
Tue Apr 09, 2013 12:17 am
 
Forum: Field observations and identification
Topic: feather leg baboon tarantula, the bite stings a bit
Replies: 12
Views: 7142

Re: Visit to BIO-KEN Watamu

Bio-Ken is a great place! For a herper, it is particularly gratifying that they display a tremendous variety of poorly known, rather obscure species, not just the usual headline grabbers (mambas, cobras, puffies, python). The people there are great too!
by WW
Mon Feb 25, 2013 10:01 am
 
Forum: Exotic reptile observation records
Topic: Visit to BIO-KEN Watamu
Replies: 10
Views: 2094

Re: Chinese whispers ... the Blaylock myth

Equally, as I explained to Arno, there is strong evidence from lymphatic transport experts that show fairly convincingly that small molecular weight proteins are taken up rapidly by capillary beds rather than lymph vessels, and that they can very quickly be transit to the systemic circulation, wher...
by WW
Sun Feb 24, 2013 6:24 pm
 
Forum: Venom Club
Topic: Chinese whispers ... the Blaylock myth
Replies: 13
Views: 2978

Re: Chinese whispers ... the Blaylock myth

Struan Sutherland actually did test his PI method on " Naja naja " (i.e., some unidentifiable Asian cobra....) venom and found it to be effective, albeit with a small sample size (of one monkey each for test and control). While not exactly a large and rigorous study, it does suggest that t...
by WW
Sun Feb 24, 2013 5:20 pm
 
Forum: Venom Club
Topic: Chinese whispers ... the Blaylock myth
Replies: 13
Views: 2978
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