Are we permitted to keep gaboon adders

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Are we permitted to keep gaboon adders

Postby Desai » Tue Mar 27, 2007 3:17 pm

Howzit guys

Are private collectors permitted to keep Bitis gabonica :?: I would really like to get a pair for myself. I have not kept any hots before and the only snake remotely venomous I kept was a rhombic night adder. At the moment my collection is a pair of Basiliscus vittatus and a Poecilotheria regalis
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Postby Mongoose » Tue Mar 27, 2007 3:19 pm

With permits you may keep them.

I do however think that keeping Gabby's as a first hot is not such a good idea, as they need very specific requirements! Try something a bit easier and common.
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Postby wickets » Tue Mar 27, 2007 3:22 pm

Maybe you should start with another bitis species, such as a horned adder, until you have built up more experience with hots. Bushmaster and Bushviper should be able to suggest a better "starter" species.
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Postby neko » Tue Mar 27, 2007 4:15 pm

You only need a permit for East Africans. West Africans don't need permits.

I agree with the other guys. Maybe start with a less lethal species. Horned adders are nice, because the bite is a nasty cyto one, but won't kill you.
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Postby Desai » Tue Mar 27, 2007 5:55 pm

Thanks for the suggestion guys. I probably will start off with the horned adder ;)
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Postby Q Ball » Tue Mar 27, 2007 6:05 pm

Sorry to hijack but can someone perhaps help with the diff between east and west African Gaboons. By that I mean Pic's and also where one would find these. Also, what is the diff in venom.
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Postby froot » Tue Mar 27, 2007 6:27 pm

I'm using a few pics from the gallery to explain. Hope the owners of the pics don't have a problem. This is how I've been told to tell them apart.

West African gaboon: Look below the eye, there is one solid brown marking.
Image


East African Gaboon: Again, look below the eye. There are now 2 brown markings under the eye seperated by a light tearline running from the eye.
Image
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Postby Q Ball » Wed Mar 28, 2007 7:19 am

Thanx froot, now anyone know wher you can get some Wets African's (Gaboons I mean) Also what is the diff in taxonimy.
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Postby Bushbaby » Wed Mar 28, 2007 8:15 am

The West African species also has a horn on the nose, where Easts dont.

I would not recommend a Horned Adder as your first hot. Firstly they are pretty hard to come by, secondly they can be fussy eaters.

I always say, if you want a hot, get an aggro yellow anaconda. If you can work it without getting nailed, you can upgrade to a hot of your choice.

And froot, those last two Gaboons are awesome!! I should get myself a pair like that :-P
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Postby Pythonodipsas » Wed Mar 28, 2007 8:49 am

Look at the nasal horns too. The west african Gaboon aslo has much longer nasal horns. Its been suggested that it gets elevated to species rank and called 'Bitis rhinocerus'. Subsequently East African Gaboons will be called 'Bitis gabonica'.

I am not sure of the exact ditribution but 'B. gabonica' occur from Zululand right up to Kenya I think. BV/BB/Someone can you help here.

I think there are some genetic differences but I am not sure on how deeply this has been researched. BV?

I think a horned adder can be very challenging for a starter venomous snake. I would maybe go for a coral snake (they always eat) or a copperhead/cottonmouth if you dont mind exotics.
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Postby Pythonodipsas » Wed Mar 28, 2007 8:52 am

Sorry BB - I didn't see your post before I posted mine which repeats what you said :)
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Postby froot » Wed Mar 28, 2007 8:54 am

A coral snake is a very good suggestion for a starter ind. venomous.
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Postby Bushviper » Wed Mar 28, 2007 9:36 am

The gaboon viper occurs from Zululand all the way up into Uganda on the eastern side of africa. It also extends inland as far as Zambia and the Congo.

The West African Gaboon is no longer Bitis gabonica rhinocerus and has been lifted to full species status as Bitis rhinocerus. It's correct name is Rhinocerus adder which becomes rather confusing with the Rhinocerus viper (Bits nasicornis).

This is so important because as a subspecies of the Gaboon viper (B. gabonica) it is subject to the law which states that any species or subspecies which occurs in South Africa is indigenous. Technically you neded permits for "West African Gaboons" all along but due to a little fight I had with Nature Conservation and a permit which was incorrectly issued we bypassed this part of the ordinance for over 12 years.

If you have a Zimbawean "Cape " parrot you still require a permit even though it is not indigenous. If you have a Roan Antelope from Malawi it is still a subspecies of the local one and you need a permit.

Get a Puff adder as a hot snake before embarking on any of these. They are also pretty in their own way and will prepare you for any other hot like Gaboon adders or such. Antivenom is available and with quick intervention tissue damage is minimal although it can be damn sore.
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Postby Q Ball » Wed Mar 28, 2007 10:31 am

Thanx for that BV, great info. I will try your sugestion first. :)
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Postby BigT » Wed Mar 28, 2007 5:21 pm

I am not an expert nor do I play one on the internet but just two quick thoughts (sorry I am not trying to hijack the thread) I often see people wanting hots being recommended a yellow annie as a training snake. But keeping an annie and a hot are different you interact differently and I know I handle my annies completely differently to how I handle my white lip I could be wrong but i dont think my annies prepared me for a hot.

Secondly and to me most importantly what do you do with your annie after a year when you feel you are ready for a hot. If you handled it like a hot you are going to have a reasonable size pissed of snake to try and home or you are going to have to keep a large angry constrictor. I dont think there is a huge market for yearling annies thanks to there reputation as there are limited numbers of idiots like my self who love annies. They are fairly high maintenance snakes and it does concern me what will become of it after that year.

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