Infuscatus bite

This section will help you get first aid treatment protocols incase of an envenomation. This includes indigenous and exotic reptiles. Please do not use this forum for photo sharing, etc.

Re: Infuscatus bite

Postby alexander » Sat Jun 25, 2011 10:54 pm

"the body compensates by activating blood factors that break down these fibrin clots resulting in the consumption of blood clotting factors, and an inbalance which results in a failure of the blood to clot."

I would just like to understand a few things:
Do these blood clotting factors not get replenished with the new inflow of blood? and why would the blood respond this way? (I assume this takes place outside of blood vessels).
Thanks
Life is but a glimpse of triumph amongst incomprehensible failure.
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Re: Infuscatus bite

Postby toxinologist » Sun Jun 26, 2011 9:11 am

Under normal conditions, the coagulation cascade is tightly controlled by a range of proteins and other factors which regulate one another to ensure that only enough thrombin is produced to generate a clot at the site of a specific injury - a cut finger for example, likewise only enough fibrinogen is then converted to produce sufficient fibrin to support this clot, etc ... the system works in a balance and the small quantities used up are readily replenished through normal blood protein and blood cell synthesis involving bone marrow and the liver. Normal synthesis in the liver of blood factors takes 6-9 hours in a healthy individual. If liver function is compromised it takes longer.

In snakebite however the activation of clotting proteins is system-wide - massive quantities are artificially activated and artificially consumed. Much too fast for the body to replenish them quickly enough to prevent bleeding from taking place. If blood or plasma is transfused, and venomis still present in the system, then any factors added by transfusion will also be quickly activated and used up, and there is a strong argument for avoiding transfusion of blood or plasma until AFTER antivenom is administered and the toxins have been neutralised, since the heightened risk of a catastrophic bleed, such as an intracranial haemorrhage needs to be avoided.

Does that help?

Cheers

David
Australian Venom Research Unit
University of Melbourne
Parkville Vic 3010 AUSTRALIA

http://www.avru.org
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Re: Infuscatus bite

Postby alexander » Sun Jun 26, 2011 11:05 am

Yes, thank you.
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