All Over Namibia

Accounts and photos of non-captive reptiles in their natural habitat in South Africa. Try to record with your account details such as time of day/night, temperature, weather conditions, lunar cycle, sex, rough age of reptile, and so on.

View Gallery

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Bushviper » Tue May 06, 2014 7:54 pm

I think they might be more closely related than other Colubrid snakes. My reasoning (if you can call it that) is that even though the one is a burrower and thickset there is a Psammophylax that also gives live birth. That could be where they are from a similar lineage.

Then to go and wet that battery you have to think the one genus is venomous with fangs and the other is not, so possibly they are not that close. It is however something that could stimulate someone to see the relationship between these genera.
It is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.

Those who are afraid to ask are ashamed of learning.
User avatar
Bushviper
Founder Member
 
Posts: 17358
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:02 am
Location: Pretoria

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Westley Price » Tue May 27, 2014 5:55 pm

On Sunday I got a call out in the village. Guy said that there was a Black Mamba under the wood pile he uses to fire up his "donkie" for hot water. Remarkably, people here seem to be able to ID Black Mambas well so off I went with all my kit.

Upon arrival I was pleasantly surprised that his wood pile was probably 30cm high and less than a meter wide. I was expecting the worst. I started moving the pile slowly until I saw a tail. Looks like a Mamba! so I slowly continue until I see a glimpse of a narrow hood. So far, so good.

Then suddenly the snake shot out at me, and my first thought is Mozam! It was certainly a cobra and in the rush I could only think of a Mozam. I had glasses on to start with so no worries. I bagged the snake quickly and took it home for a good look.

When I opened the bag I immediately saw that this was no spitter. The large rostal gave it away. It was a young Anchietas Cobra. Pretty awesome as I had never seen a wild one.

Then came the tricky bit...taking pics. I usually tire snakes out in a shady spot until most of the aggression is gone and take picks in the sun once they're calm and still cool. I followed the same plan again this time. Here are some poor pics of it acting up while I am p!ssing it off.

Image

Image

After it started to calm, I was ready to get some good pics so I moved it to a more natural setting, but now she was too tired, but still made for okay pics.

Image

See the enlarged rostral.

Image

Next I tried messing with her a bit to get pics of the hood, but alas, she had other plans. Not the hooded pics I was hoping for, but still a nice observation nevertheless. Could make any Rinkhals jealous!

Image

Image

Tried getting her agro again by tapping her tail, but the more I tapped, the wider her mouth got, haha.

Image

Watch for the sharp end!

Image
"I am dying by inches from not having anybody to talk to about insects." - Charles Darwin
User avatar
Westley Price
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 4019
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:25 am
Location: South Africa

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Lourance Klose » Wed May 28, 2014 8:58 am

Super catch and very cool observation.
User avatar
Lourance Klose
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 5:41 pm
Location: Table View, Cape Town.

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Warren Klein » Wed May 28, 2014 10:50 am

Nice catch Westley, the enlarged rostral does look quite diffent to N. annulifera. I wonder if you also get the banded variety of this species in your area?
An inaccurate naturalist is a pest and a danger, forever perpetuating illogical deductions and landing later naturalists in trouble. Damm and blast them all to hell in the most painful way. C.J.P. Ionides
User avatar
Warren Klein
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 932
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: Bela Bela, South Africa / Angola

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Westley Price » Wed May 28, 2014 12:40 pm

Thanx guys.

HH, I have not seen the banded variety in this area (like I said, this is my first wild one), but I have seen some nice banded specimen from the Windhoek area.

A calico-like, semi banded one was also recently caught in Otjiwarongo (200km south of me). Below are a few pics that Brendon, a friend of mine from Otjiwarongo took with his cellphone. Some would say this snake is ugly, but I think it's stunning. Different to the norm.

Image

Image
"I am dying by inches from not having anybody to talk to about insects." - Charles Darwin
User avatar
Westley Price
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 4019
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:25 am
Location: South Africa

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Bushviper » Wed May 28, 2014 1:50 pm

Nice pictures and also a cool observation. This shamming seems to be more common than what we originally thought.
It is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.

Those who are afraid to ask are ashamed of learning.
User avatar
Bushviper
Founder Member
 
Posts: 17358
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:02 am
Location: Pretoria

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Warren Klein » Thu May 29, 2014 12:05 pm

Nice specimen, I like the speckling on the head.

I was quite surprised when I first saw a Forest cobra shame death although not all of them will do this.
An inaccurate naturalist is a pest and a danger, forever perpetuating illogical deductions and landing later naturalists in trouble. Damm and blast them all to hell in the most painful way. C.J.P. Ionides
User avatar
Warren Klein
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 932
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: Bela Bela, South Africa / Angola

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Westley Price » Mon Jul 28, 2014 9:57 am

I am currently in southern Namibia for the week helping out our exploration team and decided to do a quick walk in the veld yesterday, even though it was probably 15 degrees and quite wet seeing as it rained the entire Friday.

Didn't find too much, but I guess better than nothing.

Pachydactylus rugosus (found this one under a rock)

Image

Love this pic

Image

Image

Agama sp. (I recon knobeli but not sure)

Image

Image

Image

Image

This Chondrodactylus sp I found out, but as I approached it noticed it didn't move. Turned out it was dead, and still limp so couldn't have been dead for long. No marks or visible injuries so possibly thermal shock of sorts.

Image

Juvenile scolopendra sp.

Image

Juvenile Solifuge

Image

This cool little beetle is shaped like a coin and flattens itself completely when harassed. Must work like a charm when it's on rocky substrate but not so well on sand.

Image

Image

Just a few habitat shots out of interest

Image

Image

Image

Panoramic

Image

I also made a video if a Six-Eyed Crab Spider disappearing into the sand within a matter of second, but will first need to upload.
"I am dying by inches from not having anybody to talk to about insects." - Charles Darwin
User avatar
Westley Price
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 4019
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:25 am
Location: South Africa

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Mitton » Mon Jul 28, 2014 12:21 pm

That panoramic shot is beautiful.

Just love the rugosus.
www.moreliapythons.co.za
User avatar
Mitton
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 3206
Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2006 12:32 pm
Location: Jhb

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Fooble » Tue Jul 29, 2014 9:36 am

Great post Wes!

Dam those rugosus are nice!

As Mitton said that panoramic is killer!
Organized crime comes in more forms than one.
User avatar
Fooble
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 5319
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2008 10:32 am
Location: Umhlanga, Durban - KZN

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Westley Price » Thu Jul 31, 2014 2:37 pm

Thanx guys!
"I am dying by inches from not having anybody to talk to about insects." - Charles Darwin
User avatar
Westley Price
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 4019
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:25 am
Location: South Africa

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Westley Price » Sun Aug 03, 2014 6:16 pm

Not a great video, but cool nevertheless how quickly the Six-Eyed Crab Spider disappears into the sand.

Apparently dangerously venomous.

http://vid127.photobucket.com/albums/p123/prcart001/P7270822.mp4
"I am dying by inches from not having anybody to talk to about insects." - Charles Darwin
User avatar
Westley Price
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 4019
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:25 am
Location: South Africa

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Warren Klein » Mon Aug 18, 2014 9:13 am

Could that Namibian sky be any more blue!! You really live in a beautiful place Westley! I love your habitat shots with herp in foreground.
An inaccurate naturalist is a pest and a danger, forever perpetuating illogical deductions and landing later naturalists in trouble. Damm and blast them all to hell in the most painful way. C.J.P. Ionides
User avatar
Warren Klein
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 932
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: Bela Bela, South Africa / Angola

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby MrG » Mon Aug 18, 2014 10:16 am

Great post.
_______________________________
www.photog.co.za
We make the moment last a lifetime!
User avatar
MrG
SA Reptiles Honorary Member
 
Posts: 1707
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 3:00 pm
Location: West-Rand

Re: All Over Namibia

Postby Westley Price » Fri Aug 22, 2014 8:25 pm

Here's a type of snake feeding I had never seen before.

I was walking around the garden a few minutes ago, glass of wine in hand, picking herbs for a Friday night pizza when I came across this massacre.

A Rhinotyphlops schlegeli petersi raiding an ants nest under some bricks in the garden. He was really going at it, noticeably shoving his head deeper into the nest, and from the first picture it's obvious the ants didn't appreciate the visitor; they were evacuating with force.

For those who are not aware, many fossorial species, such as this one, feed exclusively on ant/termite eggs. So this is what is going on here. Strangely enough, the ants were not particularly aggressive and were not attacking the snake as one would expect. Strange.

Note the ants on the left removing all the eggs from the nest.

Image

Image

Image

Very cool to witness.
"I am dying by inches from not having anybody to talk to about insects." - Charles Darwin
User avatar
Westley Price
Forum gatekeeper
 
Posts: 4019
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:25 am
Location: South Africa

PreviousNext

Return to Indigenous reptile observation and identification

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron