Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

South African snakes with venoms that are not considered to be medically important.

View gallery

Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby Durban Keeper » Fri Jan 09, 2009 12:48 pm

I've recently also acquired this female Beetzi.
Image

It's recently become extremely humid, to the extent that the levels are way, way above the ideal range for these snakes.

I decided I have to do something & in an attempt to create a controlled environment, I came up with this idea.

Image

Air intake is only above the 40w globe, which once sucked in should dry the air & deprive it of moisture. I have then mounted a fan on the opposite end of the enclosure to extract the air & aid in circulation.

What do you guys think? Will it work?
Life is but a dream for the dead.
User avatar
Durban Keeper
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 2284
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 9:14 pm
Location: Durban

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby Budda » Fri Jan 09, 2009 12:53 pm

how did you power the fan?
Always cheat; always win. The only unfair fight is the one you lose.
User avatar
Budda
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 75
Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2008 10:52 am

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby jka » Fri Jan 09, 2009 1:02 pm

In theory they globe will dry out the air and the fan should suck in fresh air and extract it again. So I would say that it could work, you just need to monitor it to ensure it doesn't became too hot.

You can power some of the computer fans with 9Volt batteries.
Evolution is an imperfect and often violent process. A battle between what exists, and what is yet to be born.

-Owned by scalybunni-
User avatar
jka
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 1704
Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 9:59 pm
Location: Wes-Kaap; Oudtshoorn

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby steve » Fri Jan 09, 2009 1:20 pm

yeah i was gonna say, just make sure it does not over heat, otherwise the concept seems like it will work. cheers
vipers?
User avatar
steve
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 1152
Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2007 6:37 pm
Location: JHB South Africa

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby pitviper95 » Fri Jan 09, 2009 1:38 pm

How ventilated is the cage?Is the lid made of mesh on top?The fan will work for sure.Just check that the cage does'nt get to hot,if it does get to hot then see if you can find a way to give the cage more ventilation
pitviper95
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Fri Aug 01, 2008 7:51 pm
Location: Midrand

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby Buck Rogers » Fri Jan 09, 2009 1:54 pm

Why not look at what others have done with bitis caudalis, ideally that is the similar conditions that you would want.
Life is a beautiful struggle
User avatar
Buck Rogers
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 1462
Joined: Thu Feb 14, 2008 2:11 pm
Location: JHB

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby Durban Keeper » Fri Jan 09, 2009 5:50 pm

Thanks for the input guys, surprisingly, it's cooler in the tank then it is outside at the moment.
Where would I find what other have done to keep Bitis happy Buck?

The entire tank's lid is full of holes, but I covered the lot up except for the one's around the globe to try & force the air intake as near to the heat source as possible.

Both Fan & globe are powered off a standard 240 w plug.

Thanks for the input...
Life is but a dream for the dead.
User avatar
Durban Keeper
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 2284
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 9:14 pm
Location: Durban

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby jka » Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:10 pm

Have a look in this thread just sure for anything related to humidity:
viewtopic.php?f=7&t=13042

It should give you the general idea of what to do.
Evolution is an imperfect and often violent process. A battle between what exists, and what is yet to be born.

-Owned by scalybunni-
User avatar
jka
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 1704
Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 9:59 pm
Location: Wes-Kaap; Oudtshoorn

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby Pazaz » Tue Jan 13, 2009 11:29 am

Hi
I am not so sure that the Light bulbs will dry the air. Moisture cannot just disappear. Heat will only change the state from say liquid to gas, but since the moisture is already in a gas form the light bulb will just increase the temperature. The reason the temp in the tank is cooler is due to the movement of the air. The air cools off completely by the time it reaches the enclosure inside the tank.

To dry air out you would need some silica or some other substance that would absorb the moisture.

A good example is hearing aids. Hearing aids are exposed to a lot of moisture in the form of sweat. As you know electronics and moisture does not go well together. So every night the hearing aid is put into a passive dryer. This is basically a bottle with a lot of beige and a couple of blue balls. Once the blue balls turn beige it has reached its capacity of moisture it can absorb. The balls then gets microwaved for a while to get the moisture out of it and it is then ready to absorb more moisture.

So if you can add some of these balls in the tank, the air will be dry. There is also an active drier but I do not know exactly how it works.
User avatar
Pazaz
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Jan 26, 2007 10:59 pm
Location: Pretoria

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby Durban Keeper » Tue Jan 13, 2009 12:39 pm

Are these blue balls the Silica you refer to? never herd of it. As long as it's not toxic it's absolutely worth a try, where might I get some? Thanks in advance Pazaz.

Dk
Life is but a dream for the dead.
User avatar
Durban Keeper
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 2284
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 9:14 pm
Location: Durban

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby Pazaz » Tue Jan 13, 2009 2:11 pm

The beige and blue ones is moisture absorbant stuff. The blue ones is just there to indicate when it is time to put it in the microwave. You can get it from any Phonac or hearing institute. Where it is toxic or not I do not know. I would think it is not. As they give it with the hearing aid to small childern without any warning that it is toxic. I think we stil have the one my son used before we got the active dryer. I will check tonight and add to this info if I find something worth mentioning.
User avatar
Pazaz
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Jan 26, 2007 10:59 pm
Location: Pretoria

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby Durban Keeper » Tue Jan 13, 2009 11:03 pm

Much appreciated, cheers...

Dean.
Life is but a dream for the dead.
User avatar
Durban Keeper
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 2284
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 9:14 pm
Location: Durban

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby Pazaz » Wed Jan 14, 2009 8:29 am

I found the info below on the net. It seems the process I described is called adsorbtion.

Silica gel can be obtained by collecting all the little packets of crystals you get in new products like shoes or electronic equipment. The problem with these are that you do not have any indication of how much moisture was already absorb or adsorb :).

Your design just need a small alteration. Instead of the lights you just need to suck the air past these pellets and you are sorted. On the container it states that the pellets are non-toxic.

The info below is just if you are interested in different methods of dehumidification.

Air may be dehumidified by

Cooling - condensation of vapor
Adsorption of water vapor
Absorption of water vapor
1. Cooling the air - vapor condensation
In a cooling system the humidity is reduced by cooling the air below dew point. A part of the moisture in the air is condensed and drained out.

2. Adsorption
In an adsorption system the humidity is reduced with an adsorbent material as silica gel or activated alumina.

Adsorption is a physical process in where

moisture is condensed and held on the surface of the material
without any change of in the physical or chemical structure of the material. The adsorbent material can be reactivated by heat.

Temperature for reactivation: 160 - 170 oC
Heat required for reactivation: 4800 - 4800 kJ/kg water removed
Silica gel - SiO2
Silica gel - SiO2 - is a hard, adsorbent, crystalline substance and very porous. Voids are about 50 - 70% by volume and adsorbs water up to 40% of its own mass. The bulk density of silica gel is 480 - 720 kg/m3. The specific heat capacity is 1.13 kJ/kgK.

Activated alumina
Activated alumina is about 90% aluminum oxide Al2O3 and very porous. Voids are about 50 - 70% by volume and adsorbs water up to 60% of its own mass. The bulk density is 800 - 870 kg/m3. The specific heat capacity is 1.0 kJ/kgK.

3. Absorption
In an absorption system the humidity is reduced with an absorbent material such as a calcium chloride solution.

Absorption involves a

change in the physical or chemical structure of the material
and it is in general not easy to reactivate the material.
User avatar
Pazaz
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Jan 26, 2007 10:59 pm
Location: Pretoria

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby froot » Wed Jan 14, 2009 9:08 am

Very interesting Pazaz.

What is the relevance of the specific heat capacities that you mentioned, is it indicative of the amount of energy required when reactivating these compounds?
Wouldn't a substance such CaCl be more accurately described as hygroscopic as opposed to 'absorbant'? Some compounds react with water, and somtimes other gases in the air too (such as CaO) to form other less desired compounds but surely compounds such as CaCl can be easily reactivated by baking in an oven to dehydrate them?
Although I havn't had much experience with this I'm not sure if a CaCl solution would be as effective as the dry crystals for removing water from the air.

Good topic.
We salute the improvement of the human genome by honoring those who remove themselves from it.
Of necessity, this honor is generally bestowed posthumously. - www.darwinawards.com
User avatar
froot
Founder Member
 
Posts: 6901
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 8:19 am
Location: Joburg, South Africa

Re: Lowering humidity for Desert Species.

Postby Durban Keeper » Wed Jan 14, 2009 6:16 pm

Thank you Pazaz.

I have been told by Clinton about a product he used to dehumidify or demoisturize the air in his babies room. From what I understand it was kind of like a pad rested in a bowel. Once the pad starts absorbing moisture it actually seeps through into the bowel to the extent that you need to take it out & empty it! He agreed to look into getting this product for me when he has a chance to. I borrowed his Exo Terra Hygrometer. My room humidity sat at a constant of 83% this morning for over an hour. I then placed it inside the top Beetzi's cage & switched the fan & light on. I checked back in two hours time & it had dropped down to 58%. That's a substantial difference!

Possibly with one of these moisture absorbing products in the enclosure near the air vents I could get it down into the 40's...

:-)

Dean.
Life is but a dream for the dead.
User avatar
Durban Keeper
SA Reptiles Member
 
Posts: 2284
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 9:14 pm
Location: Durban

Next

Return to Indigenous mildly venomous snakes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron