harlequin

South African snakes with venoms that are not considered to be medically important.

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harlequin

Postby armata » Sun Mar 25, 2007 11:20 pm

from another Oudtshoorn garden

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' I get my kicks on Route 62 '
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Postby Irock » Mon Mar 26, 2007 9:17 am

Wow that is so pretty!!!
~Meg~

1.0 Normal 1.0 Anery Motley 1.0 Butter 0.1 Ghost Motley 1.1 Reverse Okeetee 0.1 Caramel het hypo 0.1 Ultramel het caramel 1.0 Hi Red Blood 0.1 Amel hurricane motley het caramel 0.1 Amel stripe Poss. het anery ?.? Lavender
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Postby Mongoose » Mon Mar 26, 2007 9:18 am

Beutiful! I have never seen Homoroselaps! Would love to see H.dorsalis!!
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Postby Bushviper » Mon Mar 26, 2007 5:19 pm

This is possibly one of the most prolifically recorded species in the first year of the Red Data project. There were plenty found all over the country. It seems that because of the pretty colours many people see them after the rains and record them not knowing how bad the bite is.

I know of a small child bitten in Midrand many years ago that had trouble breathing but recovered.

I have also only ever seen the one pic of Bill Branch where it is eating a centipede eater. I could never get these to feed in captivity.
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Postby Hellemar » Mon Mar 26, 2007 7:39 pm

Hi...


Qute little bagger... Hard to tell, but it almost looks like he can turn around and kiss the handler in his cheek - that would have been a strange experience...



Henke :)
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Postby Mongoose » Mon Mar 26, 2007 7:43 pm

BV: May I ask what Red Data Project?

What is the bite like from them? As i have seen pictures of people free handling them.
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Postby Bushviper » Mon Mar 26, 2007 7:46 pm

Hellemar these snakes are so inoffensive I still wonder how the child got bitten. They have tiny front fangs and like a typical "snake and lizard" feeder the mouth does not open very wide.

These snakes are really small so it would have to be a lot closer to the camera to look that big in the picture.
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Postby Hellemar » Mon Mar 26, 2007 7:52 pm

Hi...


BV: Thanks for that input... It is always better when you have more information about the spieces - I don´t know a sh!t about them more than that they are venomous - therefore my response...



Henke :)
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Postby armata » Mon Mar 26, 2007 8:14 pm

There is some controversy whether they belong in the Elapidae at all - but better to treat with caution.

The are passive, but I have seen them when free handled (not by me) suddenly have a casual chew!

This one was a little over 40cm, a good size; the ones we usually find are much smaller.
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Postby Bushviper » Mon Mar 26, 2007 8:24 pm

Hellemar that is why you need to come visit SA. You could have gotten free entrance to the expo, a T-shirt and a cup of coffee too.

Now make a plan to come over here!

Armata the only time I seen this species suddenly chew is when the person has been handling other snakes just before picking them up. Yes free handling this species seems to popular even amongst the ignorant public who cannot believe such a small and pretty snake could be dangerous. I will look for pics that were sent to me illustrating this.
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Postby armata » Sun Apr 08, 2007 7:41 pm

Just a bit of taxonomy - there has always been some controversy as to what family Homeroselaps belongs too. It has been in the Apparallactinae, and I thought that it was currently thought to be an Elapid. But apparently the consensus now is that it belongs to Atractaspidae - a cool family that shares many traits with a number of Colubroid snakes, cobras, vipers, rear-fanged, etc.

Sorry if most of you knew this already, but I for one was not aware.
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Postby Bushviper » Mon Apr 09, 2007 6:39 am

I thought it was amongst the Elapids. So lets wait for the next change again.
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Postby Rob » Tue Jul 03, 2007 8:43 pm

That is a big one, never seen bigger.
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