Natural albinism (without human interference)

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Natural albinism (without human interference)

Postby Herald_23 » Sat Mar 31, 2012 12:54 am

From biology I have somewhat grasped the gist of albinism. What I would like to know is, is albinism a recessive gene that is passed through each generation of snake? E.g if a heterozygous albino king snake mated with a homozygous albino king snake, would the 50% chance offspring with heterozygous albinish continue passing that gene or would the gene only pass on through the homozygous albino offspring?
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Re: Natural albinism (without human interference)

Postby Herald_23 » Sat Mar 31, 2012 1:21 am

I forgot to add this in:
Is the albinism eventually lost through the generation of offspring of the two het. albino offspring (assuming the offspring mate only with normal (homozygous normal) king snakes?
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Re: Natural albinism (without human interference)

Postby Bushviper » Sat Mar 31, 2012 8:14 am

The albinism gene is not lost with subsequent breedings as it is inherited from one of the parents and will be there and they will pass it on to their babies but less and less of the babies will carry it with each mating. This is why people speak of 66% poss het albinos and then 50% poss het albinos although the percentages can keep going lower. Very few snakes have visible markings which show that the babies are het for a specific mutation. There are some which can be picked up by people with a keen eye. Usually this is not possible with albinism and colour mutations but more with pattern mutations.

Some snakes like mojave Ball pythons are a visual het for leucistic ball pythons. Tiger retics are visual hets for super tigers and so on.
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Re: Natural albinism (without human interference)

Postby TonyK » Sun Apr 01, 2012 8:09 am

I hope I am reading your question correctly,but it seems you are asking about the effect of breeding the heterozygous offspring vs homozygous/albino?The simple explanation is that an heterozygous animal will in theory only have a 50% chance of passing on the albino gene while a homozygous/albino will always have a 100% chance of passing on the albino gene to the offspring.Nature taking its own coarse or humans interfering the theory stays the same and the results will not change.
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Re: Natural albinism (without human interference)

Postby kathelune » Fri Jun 15, 2012 11:11 am

What kind of skin problems do people with albinism have? I'm doing some research for a project on genetics, and I was wondering what sort if specific problems do people with albinism have. I know they burn easily and are at risk for skin cancer, and obviously they are pale, but is there anything I'm missing?
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Re: Natural albinism (without human interference)

Postby TonyK » Fri Jun 15, 2012 12:49 pm

You are missing the fact that this site is called SA, wait for it,REPTILES.
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Re: Natural albinism (without human interference)

Postby Westley Price » Fri Jun 15, 2012 12:53 pm

Not only what TonyK said, but also for a project you need to do your own research. We can't spoonfeed you all the info you need!

You're on the web already, just Google it.
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